Oh, to be Mia

When I was 13, I wanted to be Mia Thermopolis. Boys and baby boomers, don’t feel disheartened that you don’t know who this is. You probably shouldn’t. I’ll fill you in:

mia-thermopolis

Played by Anne Hathaway, Mia Thermopolis was the protagonist in the 2001 comedy, The Princess Diaries. She was awkward, unpolished, and pretty weird. [And I could relate.] But in an unexpected—yet entirely expected, because it’s called The PRINCESS Diaries—turn of events, she finds out that she is not just a regular gawky teenager, but is in fact the heir apparent to a throne. She is a princess. Long story short: She gets a makeover, attends etiquette classes, and through the realization of her true identity, Mia begins to actually look like, act like, speak like, and BE a princess.

As a kid I was, and am even now, so intrigued by the transformation that happened when Mia found out who she really was—who she had been the whole time. The movie opens with her living in a glorified attic, riding a Razor scooter to school, with the San Francisco wind (smog) blowing through her unruly frizzed-out curls. Yet by the end, she’s on a personal jet flying to a mansion she didn’t know she owned in a country she didn’t know she ruled. Hair perfectly feathered, blown out straight, with plenty of frizz-control product. By the end, she looks the part, acts the part, IS the part. While I’m still waiting for my “Hey, you’re royalty” call, the message in this fairytale-esque story is striking to me:

If you don’t know who you are, you won’t act like it.

You’re thinking, “Gosh, that sounds like it should be profound, but…what?” I’ll put it another way: Without a proper understanding of your true identity, you’ll be a lamer version of who you were meant to be. Like any piece of machinery, you can’t operate at your full potential without an understanding of how and why you were built. God has so much for you—gifts, opportunities, blessings. And they’ve been yours all along. Don’t let them go unexplored and unused.

But grabbing hold of this truth is easier said than done. You have real opposition. Your enemy doesn’t want you to know who you are. If you understand you are a child of God, if you realize the authority that you have as an heir to His throne, you will walk in power and you are very dangerous to the kingdom of evil in this world. Your enemy wants you to stay a puny, hesitant, insecure high school girl (figuratively, of course).

Transformations take work. You’ll probably need to break some habits. It may take a spiritual makeover. But I assure you that things change when you find out who you really are. I challenge you to dig in to who God created you to be. Explore what He says about you and what He has for you. Subject yourself to the fullness of God in you. I promise you’ll be inspired toward a transformation of your own.

Here’s a couple good places to begin:
The Bible
Freeway: A Not-So-Perfect Guide To Freedom

 


  • Carmel Therese Davies

    Thank you for reminding me of the utmost importance of not abusing the grace and forgiveness of Jesus